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Former Turncoat releases second solo CD

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Andrew Scott, who is known for playing in, and releasing two CDs with, country rock band  the Turncoats, returned from two years teaching English and music in Japan, to release his second CD “13 Birds of Prey.”  
“It tends to be a little bit of folk, a little bit of country, a little bit of blues and a little bit of rock,” Scott said of the CD  before his show at the Slice, July 12.
“In my opinion it’s a folk album, but I don’t like to call it that. Louis Armstrong said all music is folk music because ‘folk’ just means about people,” continued Scott who is getting married this weekend. He recorded much of the material while in Japan, and the rest in James Oldenburg’s studio in Lethbridge. Being in Japan also influenced Scott’s music to an extent.
“Music is very different in Japan because the Japanese  have very different musical tastes. What they consider to be cool isn’t necessarily what we consider to be cool. It’s very different  from Canada. I don’t really know how, ” he continued adding there is a strong musical community in Japan. The recording experience in Japan was also very different in an ineffable way.
 
He also used a Japanese instrument called a pianica, which is a children’s instrument featuring a mini-keyboard with a mouthpiece attached to it.
“It’s a beautiful instrument. It’s  all over the CD,” he said, adding he also sings a Japanese song from Okinawa on the CD.
“I didn’t write it. It’s a traditional Japanese song. Okinawa is sort of like Quebec in Canada. Even their language is different. It’s really fascinating,” he said adding he is really pleased with how it turned out.
“It’s really stripped down,” he said.
 He is also playing live in Japan a fair amount.
“I play in public whenever I can, but that’s different too. I’ve had to learn a number of Japanese songs. And I’m  learning things like the Beatles. It’s hard to perform when you don’t know the local language and they don’t understand what you’re singing about, but they understand the melody and they latch onto that. It’s the same thing when I sing in japanese, I understand the melody he said,” adding he is going back to Japan for another year on July 24.
— Richard Amery, L.A. Beat editor.
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Last Updated ( Tuesday, 14 July 2009 15:48 )  
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