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Craig Moritz introduces new CD

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Craig Moritz rocked the country at Average Joes. Photo by Richard Amery For more mainstream country rock, I caught the last couple songs of Edmonton based, Medicine Hat bred country singer Craig Moritz. He was premiering his new, third CD which features the new single “Only When You’re Lonely.”


While I didn’t hear any of that, he and his tight band delivered an excellent version of John Cougar Mellencamp’s “Hurts So Good” to end their show.

He had a respectable sized crowd enjoying the music.

— by Richard Amery, L.A. Beat Editor
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Scott Cook and friends bring the country to the Tongue n Groove

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It was all about Edmonton this weekend. Laid back Edmonton based country/ folk singer Scott Cook entertained a decent sized crowd at the Tongue N Groove, May 14, one of many Edmonton musicians visiting Lethbridge this weekend. the Scott Cook band at the Tongue N Groove. Photo by Richard Amery


He started with a mellow set of country music, but picked up a the tempo a little.  


 His band was tight  and featured keyboardist Jacquie B and Jesse Dee. He then switched things up on banjo and later ukulele.

He began his show with a laid back set of country/ folk music.

He sounded a lot like John Wort Hannam with a quirkiness of  Blaze Foley.

— by Richard Amery, L.A. Beat Editor
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Local musicians pay tribute to Nirvana Unplugged

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As expected, an unplugged tribute to Nirvana’s “Unplugged in New York,” album had the Slice packed, May 13. The band, including Paul Holden on bass, Dino Scavo on accordion, drummer Kyle Harmon and guitarist/ vocalists Jon Martin and Andrew Scott, played it pretty much note perfect and had the enthusiastic audience cheering at the top of their lungs for each song.Jon Martin and Andrew Scott and friends played a tribute to Nirvana’s unplugged in New York Cd. Photo by Richard Amery


Jon Martin and Andrew Scott did solo sets to according to Martin “Show you what we can do on our own.”


Martin played a set of upbeat, David Bowie/ Mott the Hoople early ’70s style originals. On the other hand, Scott told the crowd “I’m going to play a fast and silly set because we’re going to a dark place in a little bit.”


He was true to his word as he howled, grinned and yodeled his own unique brand of country rock beginning with a unique version of Johnny Cash’s “Folsom Prison Blues,” followed by an interesting version of “Rawhide.”


 But everyone who came to hear Nirvana, was pleased.

“The Man Who Sold the World” had everyone cheering loudly.Kris Hodgson was one of several special guests playing Nirvana’s Unplugged in New York CD. Photo by Richard Amery
 Jon Martin’s voice proved to be a dead ringer for Kurt Cobain’s and his guitar was spot on, though Martin said they were going to add their own twist to Nirvana.

“It’s not that we don’t know the songs, it’s that we’re doing something different,” he told the audience.


 Both Martin and Scott traded lead vocals and guitar duties throughout and added their own stamp to the songs.


 Scavo added an interesting twist by adding accordion and Kris Hodgson joined the band on stage to add some cello to another track.

— By Richard Amery, L.A. Beat Editor
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Last Updated ( Wednesday, 18 May 2011 12:27 )
 

Marq DeSouza returns to play with family and friends

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It is always great to see Vancouver based singer songwriter Marq DeSouza when he visits his old friends and family in George DeSouza with Shane Love and Marq DeSouza. Photo by Richard AmeryLethbridge.

I arrived half way through his set, May 13 at the Owl, which started on time at 9 p.m., so unfortunately missed most of it, but caught the essence of his upbeat folk rock flavoured set.


His voice sounds a lot like Al Harlow, the lead singer of classic rockers Prism and even kind of looks like him.

He started off with just his acoustic guitar but later welcomed  Shane Love to the stage to play some drums.


As a special bonus he invited his dad, George, up on stage to play a sweet, surf tinged Joe Satriani instrumental called “Sleepwalker,” leaving the junior DeSouza to lay back and set down a rhythm.


Spencer Joe was also on the bill , but I missed most of that other than a set closing version of the Pogues “Dirty Old Town,” which sounded excellent with some violin.

— By Richard Amery, L.A. Beat Editor
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Last Updated ( Wednesday, 18 May 2011 12:00 )
 

Boogie Patrol play the soundtrack to a party any day of the week

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The Boogie Patrol set the soundtrack for a party every day of the week, even on a Thursday at the Slice, like they did, May 12.
 But first up, the Darryl Düus band including bassist Steve Harris, drummer Tyler Bird and lead guitarist Taylor Ackerman opened up the show by getting the audience in the mood to Boogie with a supremely tight set of rocking blues music.
the Boogie Patrol returned to lethbridge, May 12. Photo by Richard Amery
The band totally clicked together. They played my favourite version of “Rolling and Tumbling,” and a lot more.
 The Boogie Patrol usually sell out the Slice when they come to town, but didn’t this time. Too bad because people missed a great show. I love being able to say that, especially when I am getting sick of people telling me I’ve missed a great show. Well, I catch the ones that count. Like this one.
 The Boogie Patrol started with an extended jam on “Ain’t Much For Talking,” from their CD “Groove on or Bug Out,” which set the tone for the rest of the show. They introduced several extended jams on original psychedelic, R and B  tinged songs which kept the toes tapping. They included several new songs to appear on an upcoming album.
 The playing was impeccable, with plenty of  outstanding guitar, a groovy bass and a solid backbeat. And frontman Rotten Dan sure knows how to blow the old harp, vibrating with every molecule of his being as he howled the blues from the bottom of his heart.
The understated keyboards added to the groove and the good times provided an integral part of the Boogie on stage.

— By Richard Amery, L.A. Beat Editor
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