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Title:
Blind Melon with Eve 6
When:
Fri, Jun 22
Where:
Lethbridge
Category:
Rock

Description

Time: 8:30 p.m.

Tickets:$45 advance $50 at door

TWO GREAT ROCK BANDS, BLIND MELON AND EVE6 AT THE JOE

Lethbridge, AB. - There will be a great night of rock music at Average Joe’s Sports Bar on Friday June 22nd. One of the most memorable and pure sounding bands from the 90’s, BLIND MELON will take to the stage. Their stripped down, rootsy sound resonated with the alt rock/grunge movement and the hit song, “No Rain” propelled them to stardom. They had gigs with the likes of Guns N’ Roses, Neil Young and the Rolling Stones. The group officially folded in 1999 but with much pent up demand for their music, Blind Melon re-formed in 2007. Since then, they have been presenting their music and sound in concerts all over the world.

Also on the bill is the southern Californian rock band EVE 6. Their first album in 1998 included the platinum selling single, “ Inside Out”. In 2000 Eve 6 put out the album, Horoscope that went gold and included the Top 40 hit, “Here’s to the Night”. The group broke up in 2004 but later re-united. A new album, “Speak in Code”, was released in 2012 and they have been touring with great success ever since. An Eve 6 concert includes a solid mix of dance floor filling rock with their more punky sing all the words hit singles.
Tickets for this two band, double dose of rock music are $45.00 in advance or $50.00 at the door. Advance tickets can be purchased on line at www.thejoe.ca or at Average Joe’s, 420 -6th street south.

Blind Melon http://www.Blindmelon.com

In recent years, the tale of Blind Melon has taken a dramatic turn – from an abrupt and tragic end, to a rebirth and reconnection with their legion of dedicated fans. No matter how you slice it, the group was responsible for some of the most memorable and pure-sounding rock music of the ‘90s, and with their reformation in 2007 with singer Travis Warren, Blind Melon have picked up with their fans, exactly where they left off. Blind Melon originally formed in 1990 in Los Angeles, California, when five transplants from other states crossed paths – singer Shannon Hoon (from Indiana), guitarist Christopher Thorn (from Pennsylvania), and guitarist Rogers Stevens, bassist Brad Smith, and drummer Glen Graham (all from Mississippi). With a buzz created around the band shortly thereafter due to Hoon’s appearance on Guns N’ Roses’ 1991 release, ‘Use Your Illusion’ (and specifically, the hit single/video, “Don’t Cry”), a recording contract soon followed with Capitol Records. The group’s now-classic self-titled debut followed in 1992.
The album saw the group fit in perfectly with the then-burgeoning alt rock/grunge movement, due to their stripped-down, rootsy sound, as evidenced by such standouts as “Tones of Home” and “Change.” But it was the song “No Rain” that became a smash on radio and MTV a year later, and Blind Melon became one of rock’s feel-good ‘overnight success stories.’ As the album scaled the charts, plum opening gigs piled up over the next year – Guns N’ Roses, Neil Young, Lenny Kravitz, and the Rolling Stones, as well as an unforgettable appearance at Woodstock ’94. Despite high expectations, the group’s sophomore release, 1995’s ‘Soup,’ was panned by critics upon release. Over the years however, the album has rightfully become recognized as one of the decade’s most underrated rock gems, spawning such standouts as “Galaxie,” “Toes Across the Floor,” and “Mouthful of Cavities.” Barely over two months after the album’s release, Hoon died while on tour from a drug overdose, at the age of 28. The four surviving members regrouped and issued an outtakes collection, 1996’s ‘Nico’ (named after Hoon’s then-baby daughter, and spawning such further Melon classics as “Soup” and “Soul One”), as well as the Grammy nominated home video, ‘Letters from a Porcupine.’ An attempt to find a replacement for Hoon was abandoned, and in 1999, the group officially went their separate ways. Smith and Thorn subsequently formed a short-lived group, Unified Theory featuring Dave Krusen of Pearl Jam and Chris Shinn of Live, as well as opening up their own recording studio (Wishbone), and becoming much-in-demand producers, working with such artists as Anna Nalick, Critter Jones and Under the Influence of Giants. Thorn also played in Live and Awol Nation and Smith has released two full length solo records under the moniker “Abandon Jalopy”.
Stevens, having moved to New York, appeared in a pair of groups, Extra Virgin and Tender Trio, while Graham, who also settled back east, outside of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, played with Jimbo Mathus and his Knocked Down Society, Joe Tullos, and The Harmony Four in addition to founding The Meek and The Jakeleg. Also during these intervening years, interest in Blind Melon continued to grow further, due to the emergence of the jam band scene – which many feel the group helped create -while such compilations as 2002’s ‘Classic Masters’ and 2005’s ‘Tones of Home: The Best of,’ as well as 2005’s ‘Live at the Palace’ CD and ‘Live at the Metro’ DVD, racked up impressive sales. Add to it an ever-growing Blind Melon online community of fans, and it was clear that there was still an unmistakable demand for the band. And it was precisely around this time that Smith and Thorn were asked to produce a few tracks for Texas-based singer/songwriter, Warren – who also happened to be a die hard Blind Melon fan. Working with Warren on his demo, Smith jokingly said to Thorn that Warren “could sing Blind Melon songs in his sleep.” The idea was born. The four remaining members – who hadn’t been in the same room in years – came together to be reacquainted with each other, and to meet with Warren. Soon after, it had become apparent that they had finally located Blind Melon’s new singer. With Stevens and Graham reclaiming their spots as well, Blind Melon was back in business. Setting up shop at Wishbone, the reformed band spent most of 2007 writing and recording. But before issuing a new album, the group decided to introduce their newest member via a highly successful and completely sold out club tour in late 2007. If the strong response from fans at these shows is any indication, the group’s upcoming shows and forthcoming new music will continue to spread the word even further.
After a short hiatus in 2009, Blind Melon has again returned to the stage playing cities all over the globe including North America, South America, Europe, Asia and more. The band continues to play a handful of special shows each year looking forward to what the future will bring.
Eve 6 http://www.eve6.com

Eve 6 weren’t even legal drinking age when they were presented with their first platinum record. Thus, life came hard and fast at the members of SoCal pop-punk trio, whose meteoric success in the late ‘90s and early millennium ingrained their anthemic radio hits into the fabric of the lives of a whole generation. Then, it all sort of ended…until now.

Reunited and re-energized, the band is returning with new album Speak In Code eight years after parting ways in 2004. As the fourth full-length release for Eve 6 and their debut on new label Fearless Records, the album heralds not just a return to form for the threesome, but a new chapter in a book that had ended all too abruptly.

“Overall I'm really proud of it, and I think we're doing right by our fans, who’ve waited a long time for us to make another record. I think we're giving them something they'll enjoy,” says singer/bassist Max Collins. “Once we got in the studio there was a lot of energy. There aren't any filler moments; each song has its purpose. This is the strongest collection of songs we've ever had on one record.”

Eve 6—which also includes drummer Tony Fagenson and guitarist Jon Siebels—formed in Southern California in 1995 while the trio were just teenagers, then inked a deal with RCA Records before they’d finished high school. The band issued the self-titled Eve 6 in 1998, attaining platinum success with hit singles “Inside Out” and “Leech,” the former capturing the #1 spot on the Modern Rock charts and crossing over successfully to Top 40 radio. More widespread recognition came with gold-selling sophomore effort Horrorscope (2000), which spawned radio gems “Promise,” “On The Roof Again” and the ubiquitous prom and MTV anthem “Here’s To The Night”.

It seemed like Eve 6 were everywhere—the band made appearances on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, The Late Show with David Letterman, Jimmy Kimmel Live, Late Night With Conan O’Brien, and TRL with Carson Daly, with their videos in constant rotation on MTV. The band then released the more experimental It’s All In Your Head in 2003, featuring singles “Think Twice” and “At Least We’re Dreaming,” but parted ways with RCA thereafter. Their rapid rise to prominence at an early age had led to an inevitable mental and physical exhaustion, and in 2004 Eve 6 announced an indefinite hiatus. It was time to turn a new page.

“There were parts which were fucking incredible, and amazing and awesome, and there were aspects that were terrifying and freaky that you don't know how to handle. I feel like we did some growing up in public,” says Collins. “I needed to stop drinking. In order to do that, the wheels had to come off. I don't think I could have done it if the band was still going.”

After a year apart, Collins and Fagenson began writing and producing for other artists, including 2007’s hit ballad “We Don’t Have To Look Back Now” for rock band Puddle of Mudd, and collaborating on a new experimental side project, the Sugi Tap. "It was an inspiring time, going down different musical avenues together and trying things we wouldn't have in Eve 6,” reflects Fagenson. “Ironically, when we did reform Eve 6 a couple years later, those experiments allowed us to progress the sound of the band more freely than if we had been in the band the whole time."

Collins and Fagenson eventually reignited Eve 6 in 2008, with guitarist Matt Bair temporarily replacing Siebels who was occupied with his project Monsters Are Waiting. The band spent the next two-plus years touring, writing and reconnecting with fans, then in 2011, armed with new material and management, signed with Fearless Records. A month within inking the deal Collins and Fagenson finally convinced Siebels to return to the fold.

“After going down some different paths it hit me that there was this thing out there that people wanted and wanted to hear,” explains Siebels. “It just clicked and made sense to me. After such a long break I was so happy to be playing with these guys again.” Continues Fagenson, "The way [Siebels] hits the strings and puts that muscle into the chords is very distinctive to our band, and that was a welcome piece of the sound that we had missed. Songs that had been kicking around for a couple years got new life with his playing put into them.”

Eve 6 then re-enlisted Don Gilmore (Linkin Park, Dashboard Confessional, Good Charlotte, Pearl Jam)—who produced the first two Eve 6 full-lengths—to helm the sessions for Speak In Code. With all the lead time, the album contains a mix of compositions that began as far back as the side project, as well as recent works written in the months leading up to the recording process. “We were really taking a ‘best of everything’ sort of approach, almost like a band's first album, in which there's a lot of material to choose from,” Fagenson notes. “About half the songs were standouts from what Max and I had been working on and demoing over the years, and the other half were newer ideas that came with the inspiration of Jon's return and all that was happening to us at the time. We have a unique process, where each song is sort of its own animal. Don was crucial in helping us tighten everything up, and inspiring Max to dig really deep lyrically and get to some root emotion down there.” Explains Collins, “Neil Finn [of Crowded House] once said, ‘A great producer is someone whom you admire musically and otherwise, who you feel compelled to show up and show off for.’ I feel like Don is that figure for me and the band.”

In many ways, Speak In Code is a work with deep personal significance for Collins, who has weathered his share of personal adversity. The album is a testament to coming out okay on the other side, with friendships still intact, but it’s within the journey that the story truly lies. Whether it’s romantic relationships or dealings with his bandmates, communication—and its barriers—is a central theme underpinning the release.

“In some of the songs frustration is a theme. I was sort of looking at difficult personal relationships with a humorous spin in some places, and with more earnestness in others,” explains Collins. “The title [Speak In Code] is a lyric from ‘Curtain,’ and there was something kind of evocative about it. In that song, I'm referring to being newly sober and just feeling like an open nerve, feeling freaked out, having people and life being sort of overwhelming. It's almost like people are speaking a language you don't understand.”

Opening track “Curtain” is a pivotal moment for several reasons—not only does it provide a title concept, but it also speaks to the group’s return from hiatus, drawing on the relations between the notoriously volatile Gallagher brothers from Britpop icons Oasis. “There was a lot that I could identify with there,” Collins says. “Being in a band is like a marriage; it's like a family. You're in the trenches with these guys, and sometimes it's easy and awesome, and sometimes it's not so easy.”

First single “Victoria” lyrically weaves a tale that draws the listener into a hook-laden, 80‘s-influenced anthem, putting a contemporary spin on the classic Eve 6 sound. “[‘Victoria’] indulges this paranoid what-if fantasy that kind of has a foot in the truth: My wife went on this girls’ vacation to Mexico, and when I was looking through the photos, I saw my imagination start to go, and wrote that song,” Collins recalls. “I'm convinced in my mind that something’s going on that really isn't.”

Far from being just some nefarious nostalgia cash-in, Speak In Code is a genuine example of triumphing over one’s obstacles, both professionally and personally, seven years in the making. Eve 6 say the time rebuilding was essential to regaining their footing, which seems more solid in 2012 than ever. "In a lot of ways, the years leading up to this album release was a bit of a ‘paying our dues’ situation. We certainly had to earn the right to have this opportunity again,” says Fagenson. “This time around I think we realized just how hard it is to really get a rock band going and just when you think you're near the finish line you realize there's another hundred miles to go. But all that work and time simply strengthened our belief in what we were doing, and it was a crucial aspect of our development. It really taught us about stick-with-it-ness and perseverance."

"The time we spent apart really made us appreciate what we have in each other. It's a chemistry you can't manufacture,” adds Collins. “We literally grew up playing music together. The bond that we have as a result of so much shared experience infuses the sound of the band."

With 'Speak In Code' slated for an April 24th release, the band is gearing up for their much-awaited reintroduction to fans. Now part of the Fearless Records family, it’s a guarantee Eve 6’s music will reach a wide, eager audience of potential devotees, and a full slate of touring behind the release is slated for 2012. Diehards who caught the band live in prior years will undoubtedly be thrilled to see the trio once again on stage, but it will be a somewhat older, definitely wiser group that greets them. According to Collins, it’s all good.

“We’re looking forward to playing new songs, and reconnecting to the fans with new material,” says Collins. “I feel this profound gratitude to the other two guys in my band. We've been through a lot—we've had the mountaintop moments and the Death Valley moments—and we're still here today, we all get along, and we made this thing together. It's almost miraculous, to me. There's this convergence that goes on for something that's bigger than the sum of its parts, and that's such a joyful, cool fucking thing.”

Venue

Average Joe's Sports Bar/ Joe's GarageMap
Venue:
Average Joe's Sports Bar/ Joe's Garage
Street:
420 - 6 Street South
ZIP:
T1J 2B8
City:
Lethbridge
State:
AB
Country:
Country: ca

Description

This is the new location of Average Joes Downtown — 420 - 6 Street South.

 For many years now, you have enjoyed the great fun and friendly atmosphere at Average Joe's Sports Bar. Yes, the Lethbridge spot that has been named the best sports bar in Canada is going bigger and better. Coming soon, the A.J's team will be adding a new dimension to the downtown scene. They are going to welcome you to an exciting new venue at " COYOTE JOE'S".
Every Friday and Saturday night, Coyote Joe's will be open for a wild and rollicking session of music and dancing. Yes, Coyote Joes's will have live bands and top notch DJ's playing your favorite Rock ‘n'Country tunes. There will be contests, drink specials, and great food to go along with all the music your toe tapping feet can handle. Coyote Joe's will quickly become the place in town to let your hair down, get rocking with your favorite partner, and show off your classic dancing style.

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